wedding-videographer

How to choose the perfect videographer for your wedding

May 20, 2015

Your wedding photographs form an important memento of your big day – pictures that you'll cherish for an entire lifetime. As time moves on, though, so does technology. With increasing regularity, happy couples are turning to professional videographers to capture the finest essence of their special in the sun.

Though the wedding photograph will remain a quintessential part of any ceremony, even the most high-resolution pictures won't be able to replicate the beautiful, flowing movements of your wedding dress as you gracefully strut your stuff.

A memento that will last generations

The days of videographers struggling under the weight of an enormous camera, in an effort to gain grainy, low-quality footage of your big day are all but over. Technology marches ever forward, and today, miniature, high-quality digital cameras are the norm.

Not only will you receive a shimmering, technicolour keepsake of your wedding, it'll arrive on DVD, meaning that it'll last well over 100 years. Therefore, your great-great-great grandchildren will be able to watch their ancestors' wedding in crisp quality, unlike if you'd used videotape, which has a maximum lifetime of 15 years (less if you watch it over and over, which you surely will!). 

The days of videographers struggling under the weight of an enormous camera, in an effort to gain a grainy, low-quality film of your big day are all but over. Technology marches ever forward, and today, miniature, high-quality digital cameras are the norm.

How to choose a great videographer

Sometimes, choosing a videographer gets pushed right down the list of many things you need to sort out, but try and book one in as soon as possible. This way, you'll have a broader range to choose from, ensuring that you aren't forced to go with someone who lacks the necessary experience and knowhow when it comes to making films. Here are four things to consider.

– Check his or her previous examples

Just as you would with your photographer, examining your potential videographer's portfolio is an absolute priority. Try and watch a broad range of their work, as this may help you find a certain style to go for. What's more, don't be tempted to skip scenes or fast-forward – you need to discover if your director will capture the whole event, and not one narrow part of it. You can even ask for a reference from previously filmed weddings if you want to delve a little deeper. 

 – Money matters

That old adage 'you get what you pay for' is never truer than when hiring a videographer. Though it's true that there are many talented filmmakers out there just starting out, are you willing to risk them on your big day? Perhaps it's better to go with a more experienced professional, albeit one that is bound to cost a fair bit more. 

Try to remember this simple saying when looking for a videographer: 'Cheap videos aren't good, and good videos aren't cheap.' You have to bear in mind that producing an excellent, polished film can take a long time, with the use of high-end equipment – this will help you to appreciate why prices may seem a little steep.

Making a movie of your wedding will lend you a memento that will last for decades.Making a movie of your wedding will lend you a memento that will last for decades.

 – Communication is crucial

When you meet your potential videographer, it's imperative that he or she displays excellent communication skills. Why? Well, they'll need to get on with everyone that they plan on filming, from you right through to your flower girl.  

What's more, ensuring that you both are singing from the same hymn sheet  means that everything will run more smoothly, from the filming of the event itself, to the reception, to the finished product.

 – Lights, camera… I do!

Ask your videographer what kind of camera they intend upon using, as well as how many will be used on the day. Two cameras should be the absolute minimum – that's because just a single lens won't be able to capture everything possible, like the expression on the groom's face as well as the bride as she walks down the aisle, and may miss something important. Two, or even three cameras are the norm – this way, a wider range of shots can be utilised, and broader creativity used in the editing process.